REVIEW: ‘Namor: Conquered Shores,’ Issue #4

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Namor Conquered Shores #4 - But Why Tho

Namor: Conquered Shores #4 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Christopher Cantwell, art by Pasqual Ferry, colours by Matt Hollingsworth, and letters by Joe Caramagna. Namor and Luke Cage find Human Torch and a machine commune living by themselves. But Machine Man’s attack has led to mistrust.

This issue has a plot smothered with tension and suspicion. This is built not only over the course of the four issues contained within this story, but close to 80 years of history within Marvel, Atlas, and Timely Comics. Namor: Conquered Shores: #4 brings another group into the complicated structure of this dystopian future. And there are conflicting thoughts around this group. There are signs of peace and protection, but also ones of conflict and war. The eruption of violence is constantly just a sneer or insult away, always threatening to boil over. The book actually reaches a form of peace and serenity by the final chapter, with glimmers of that idyllic future held in the minds of Steve, Namor, and the most positive people left alive. Or at least, that would be the case if it wasn’t for an explosive finale that threatens to take away everything Namor has left.

Cantwell’s script and dialogue are really special. What makes the primary characters in this series shine is an unrivaled history among their fellow Marvel heroes. Captain America. The original Human Torch. Namor the Sub-Mariner. Icons of wartime comics that have lasted and maintained respect for each other over decades. With Hammond and Namor, there will always be that animosity between them. What is touching is the way both of them still have almost an indomitable admiration for Steve Rogers. Hammond’s quite calm demeanor is a beautiful contrast with the rash anger and hot-headedness of the Atlantean King. A great piece of character development that comes from Cantwell is the actual devolution of development. Namor has spent a long time trying to adjust and become a better man, attempting to be calm and less arrogant. But as events transpire, that old-school Namor resurfaces with catastrophic consequences.

The art is brilliant. The newcomer to the series is the Human Torch. Similarly to his old allies, time has had a slight effect on him, but that is largely due to a lack of tools for facial hair. Something about all of these figures being older men now creates a tinge of sadness in an already tragic world. It shows they’re not these immortal, timeless beings that comics have represented them as for so long. The issue is quiet regarding fights right until the end, where there is an explosive, emotional scrap. I love the panels that seem to homage pieces in both MARVELS and comics from the later 30s and early 40s.

The colours are fascinating, especially with the introduction of the Human Torch. He is composed of what is easily the brightest and most intense part of the issue. The brilliant flames crackle and whirl. It is a mix of both line art and colours, but I have always adored that swirling mass of flames that is more mysterious and imposing than that of Johnny Storm. The letters are extremely easy to read.

Namor: Conquered Shores #4 is a touching penultimate issue. The emotions and desperation in this chapter are high, and that atmosphere is superbly manifested by both writer and artists. This comic has seemed like a love story to classic comic stories and characters, whether they are in the book or not. That is most prevalent in this issue, leading to both heartwarming and gutwrenching parts. Cantwell is using and respecting the characters beautifully whilst also telling an incredibly interesting story. 

Namor: Conquered Shores #4 is available where comics are sold.


Namor: Conquered Shores #4
5

TL;DR

Namor: Conquered Shores #4 is a touching penultimate issue. The emotions and desperation in this chapter are high, and that atmosphere is superbly manifested by both writer and artists. This comic has seemed like a love story to classic comic stories and characters, whether they are in the book or not.

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