REVIEW: ‘Dark Crisis: The Deadly Green,’ Issue #1

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Dark Crisis: The Deadly Green #1

Dark Crisis: The Deadly Green #1 is a prestige one-shot from DC Comics that ties into the events of Dark Crisis on Infinite Earths. In order to learn the secrets of the Great Darkness, a collection of heroes has joined forces. Among those heroes are the new Swamp Thing, Jonathan Kent, and Raven, who travel into Alan Scott’s ring to confront the Great Darkness. But that darkness is aware of their presence and puts them through the wringer. The same happens to Scott, as his children Jade and Obsidian attempt to break through his mental defenses.

The Deadly Green #1  is written by Ram V, Alex Paknadel, and Dan Watters. Daniel Bayliss illustrates pages 1-9, while Tom Derenick illustrates pages 10-17 and 31-39. Rounding out the art team is George Kambadais on pages 21-25 and Brent Peeples on pages 18-20, 26-30, and 40. The entire one-shot is colored by Matt Herms and lettered by Troy Peteri.

Dark Crisis has paid homage to the original Crisis on Infinite Earths throughout its run, and The Deadly Green #1 continues that trend by exploring the connection that the original Swamp Thing had with the Great Darkness. More than that, it explores the very nature of darkness. We often see darkness as something to be frightened of, to shun. But The Deadly Green #1 offers a different perspective: darkness can often help you find your inner strength. And if it gets to be too much, you can always rely on the people closest to you to get you through things.

V previously wrote the latest Swamp Thing maxiseries, which makes him a perfect fit for this story. He’s joined by Paknadel and Watters, who have fun with the different character dynamics. Not only is there family drama with the Scotts, but there’s also an interesting connection between Jon and Swamp Thing. Though they have different powers and come from different worlds, they’re powered by the sun — and their power is being drained by the Great Darkness, which also affects their mental state. As for Raven and John Constantine, the writers understand how their inner darkness has shaped their lives and how they combat it.

The art fluctuates based on the setting, which is a neat way to show the different planes of existence the book circles through though it can cause a little bit of whiplash. Things shift from a more heroic, animated style with Bayliss’ opening pages to dark and twisted from the other artists. The highlight is Derenick, as he gets to draw a fusion between Swamp Thing and Superman. The elemental hero has taken the form of a super suit, his branches wrapping and coiling around the young Man of Steel. Combined with Herms’ muted colors, especially in the use of contrasting greens to represent Swamp Thing’s powers, it makes for a compelling image.

Dark Crisis: The Deadly Green #1 peers deep into the Great Darkness and tests various heroes in the process. Though it’s light on the action, it’s a great read solely for the philosophical elements presented within. Plus, the idea of a Superman/Swamp Thing fusion is just too good to pass up in my book.

Dark Crisis: The Deadly Green #1 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Dark Crisis: The Deadly Green #1
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TL;DR

Dark Crisis: The Deadly Green #1 peers deep into the Great Darkness and tests various heroes in the process. Though it’s light on the action, it’s a great read solely for the philosophical elements presented within. Plus, the idea of a Superman/Swamp Thing fusion is just too good to pass up in my book.

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