REVIEW: ‘Daisy,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Daisy #1 - But Why Tho

Daisy #1 is a horror comic created by Colin Lorimer, published by Dark Horse. Lorimer is both the writer and the artist, whilst both Joana Lafuente and Anita Vu. The letterer is Jim Campbell. This is the first in a 5 part series. A woman enters a rural town looking for her missing child. Meeting a kind sheriff, Lindsay persuades him to help her follow a lead that could lead her to her son. This is a journey that will not go to plan. Elsewhere, a bedtime story is being told to children. This is a frightening story, one containing giants and angels.

The plot of this opening issue will instantly draw its victims in. the opening half of the issue is a masterclass in how to build a story. Three locations are introduced in quick succession, but by the time the third arrives we are led to believe this is the primary plotline that the readers are supposed to follow. A suspected main character appears with backstory and clear object. From this, we can get comfortable. Except we can’t. 

Lorimer hits the reader with an absolute gut punch, flipping the perspective so quickly that heads will spin. After that, the historical, storytelling aspect of the horror comic takes place, as well as the fantasy element. This is a comic that appears to have religious horror in mind, using the frightening parts of the Bible to enrich the script. The final part of Daisy #1 sets up a mystery that will be fascinating to explore further, and to even higher levels than have already been seen.

In regards to characters, it is very difficult to know the motivations of anyone involved in the comic. But all of them are very interesting, with unique facets. The title character, Daisy, is actually not the main character in this premier issue. And that’s because there really isn’t one. Just when the audience gets comfortable with a personality, something happens to change our opinion. But that is what makes this comic so investing. A person that at first glances is friendly and helpful could be despicable in the next page. The eloquent, biblical nature of the narration is twinned with sinister dialogue that is superb to read.

Along with the incredible script, Lorimer is also an outstanding artist. Daisy #1 is a comic featuring two different settings with are vastly different. One is this small town, which has been brought to life with an insidious beauty. The style of the artist is detailed without showing too much. But there is also a fantastical element, showing the ended of a historical battle. The art style fits both of these. Injuries and damage has a gruesome, honest amount of specificity. The shock value that the script contains begins with the art hitting the reader with its intensity. But there is also a subtly. Smiles are thinly veiled, often on faces covered in blood

The colours are also fantastic. Both Vu and Lafuente do a great job at separating the two settings. There is an autumnal look to the town, Lindsay arrives at dusk, so the sun is going down. Faded browns are the primary colour, but with some occasional, beautiful glimpses of a purple sky. None of the colours are too stark, bringing the tone of the comic down. This is very opposing in the other sequence. There is one colour that is almost overpowering that covers the whole page. There is a crystalline blue, ethereal in the shine placed over the image. It adds a very surreal element to the comic, which is different to the reality that the modern half of the comic is set in.

The lettering is great. It is easy to read and the font matches the rough tone of the series.

Daisy #1 is a first issue that makes an impact unlike any other. The plot is fascinating, with Lorimer’s clues to where the story could be taken still perplexing the reader hours after reading. The twist is one of the most powerful this reviewer has seen, breathtaking in its strength. The art is a great style that is able to share both brutality and beauty.

Daisy #1 is available where comics are sold.


Daisy #1
5

TL;DR

Daisy #1 is a first issue that makes an impact unlike any other. The plot is fascinating, with Lorimer’s clues to where the story could be taken still perplexing the reader hours after reading. The twist is one of the most powerful this reviewer has seen, breathtaking in its strength. The art is a great style that is able to share both brutality and beauty.

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