REVIEW: ‘Spider-Man: The Lost Hunt,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Spider-Man The Lost Hunt #1 - But Why Tho

Spider-Man: The Lost Hunt #1 is written by J.M. DeMatteis, penciled by Eder Messias, inked by Belardino Brabo, colored by Neeraj Menon and Cris Peter, and lettered by VC’s Joe Caramagna. It’s published by Marvel Comics. Years ago, Kraven the Hunter faced Spider-Man in one final battle—burying the web-slinger and assuming his mantle in the process. But Spidey broke free, and Kraven ended up taking his life. Now, Peter has passed down the mantle of Spider-Man to his clone Ben Reilly after losing his powers.

But Peter is being tormented by nightmarish visions of the villains he’s battled as Spider-Man, and the stress is putting a test to his marriage with Mary Jane Watson. Little does he know that the nightmares are a weapon wielded by Gregor: the man who trained Kraven to be a hunter. Seeking revenge for the death of his protege, Gregor will not rest until Peter Parker’s mind and spirit are utterly broken. And then, he’ll move in for the kill.

Spider-Man: Kraven’s Last Hunt is my favorite comic book of all time. In the same vein as All-Star Superman or Batman: The Long Halloween, it’s a story that encompasses everything that makes Spider-Man what he is, and has stood the test of time. DeMatteis has also proven to be a legend in his own right, scripting scores of comics to this day as well as animated projects. It only makes sense that he’d be the one to pen the spiritual sequel to Kraven’s Last Hunt. What makes The Lost Hunt #1 stand out is its approach to the characters. DeMatteis juxtaposes Gregor’s drive for revenge with Peter’s struggle to find out who he is without Spider-Man. And MJ also gets time in the spotlight, as she’s ecstatic to start a new life but runs into a wall while trying to talk to Peter.

In terms of art, Messias & Brabo deliver artwork that’s every bit as mesmerizing – and disturbing – as the illustrations Mike Zeck provided for Kraven’s Last Hunt. Multiple pages feature Peter being pulled into a nightmarish realm, reverting to 15 years old and battling monstrous versions of the foes he’s faced as Spider-Man. Spidey fans will never look at villains like the Rhino and the Vulture the same way again. And in the opening sequence, they draw a series of panels that push in on Peter’s face, revealing the panic dancing behind his eyes. TThis is the second time a Spider-Man story has stepped into nightmare fuel this year, and it’s surprisingly fertile ground for the web-head.

Rounding out the art team are colorists Menon and Peter, who take a more muted tone than expected for a Spider-Man comic. Shadows creep around every corner, illustrating the threat that Gregor poses to Peter. A reddish-orange glow surrounds Peter during his nightmare sequences, conjuring visions of hell. And bluish-white lightning pierces a rainy sky in the opening pages, serving as a harbinger of the chaos to come. Caramagna’s lettering pays homage to Kraven’s Last Hunt, with yellowish-orange captions resembling a journal for Gregor and the standard red and white representing Peter’s thoughts.

Spider-Man: The Lost Hunt #1 tests the web-slinger mentally and physically while picking up in the wake of a classic Spidey story. Even if you haven’t read Kraven’s Last Hunt, this is still worth picking up. It’s the perfect reminder of why Spidey has continued to endure as a character after 60 year

Spider-Man: The Lost Hunt #1 is available wherever comics are sold.


Spider-Man: The Lost Hunt #1
5

TL;DR

Spider-Man: The Lost Hunt #1 tests the web-slinger mentally and physically while picking up in the wake of a classic Spidey story. Even if you haven’t read Kraven’s Last Hunt, this is still worth picking up. It’s the perfect reminder of why Spidey has continued to endure as a character after 60 year

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