REVIEW: ‘Hulk,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 2 minutes
Hulk #2
I said in my review of the first issue that Cates’ scripting and Ottley’s art made for a winning combination, and that trend continues here. In keeping with the new sci-fi element the series has taken, Cates introduces all manner of intergalactic elements — including a writhing mass of glowing green tentacles that manages to trap the Hulk and a team that is a clear riff on DC Comics’ ruthless superhero team, The Authority. However, he also takes the time to introduce cracks in Banner’s psyche, including the ghost of his first love Betty Ross. Betty serves as both angel and devil on Banner’s shoulder, laying out his various insecurities as the Hulk’s body begins to undergo all manner of stress. The smashing is all well and good, but the best Hulk stories delve into the emotional impact of Bruce Banner’s actions; thankfully, Cates understands that.
When it comes to said smashing, Ottley is more than eager to bring Cates’ insane ideas to life. Continuing his nods to Invincible, one of the Authority stand-ins bears more than a passing resemblance to a Viltrumite—  including a long flowing mustache and an all-white uniform. And there is plenty of gore to go around, both in the strange dimension that the Hulk passes through and in the interior of the “Engine Room.” In order to keep the Hulk up and running, Banner has to keep him angry; said anger is fueled by a wave of escalating opponents. Ottley draws a wave of monsters, including the giant dragon Fin Fang Foom, as well as a massive take on a beloved Marvel hero. Suffice it to say, they learn in a horrifyingly bloody fashion why the Hulk is “the strongest there is.”
Rounding out the artistic team are Martin and Petit, and their color art & lettering continue to underline the Hulk’s rage. In the “Engine Room,” Petit describes the stages of Hulk’s anger in large white letters, which is extremely appropriate given the colossal-sized opponents the jade behemoth tackles. And Martin continues to make red, the color primarily associated with anger, a recurring motif. From the “bridge” of Starship Hulk, where Banner holds court, to the hellish tint of the “Engine Room,” readers will literally be seeing red. The other prominent color is obviously green, with the Hulk himself and Fin Fang Foom standing out due to their emerald-hued skin.
Hulk #2 continues the “Smashtronaut” arc by plunging Bruce Banner into a not-quite final frontier, complete with a whammy of a final page. Things have only gotten interesting, and I hope to see what other surprises the creators have stored aboard Starship Hulk.
Hulk #2 is available now wherever comics are sold.

Hulk #2
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TL;DR

Hulk #2 continues the “Smashtronaut” arc by plunging Bruce Banner into a not-quite final frontier, complete with a whammy of a final page. Things have only gotten interesting, and I hope to see what other surprises the creators have stored aboard Starship Hulk.

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