REVIEW: ‘Namor: The Sub-Mariner – Conquered Shores,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Namor: The Sub-Mariner - Conquered Shores #2

Namor: The Sub-Mariner – Conquered Shores #2 is published by Marvel, written by Christopher Cantwell, art by Pasqual Ferry, colors by Matt Hollingsworth, and letters by Joe Caramagna. In an alternate future where the surface world was ravaged by a Kree attack and the heroes lost in space, an aged Namor struggles with his place on the planet. After catching a glimpse of the original Human Torch during a brawl, Namor has a plan that may save humanity. It just means finding the Torch again with help from Luke Cage.

This issue carries so much difference from the first issue. At the beginning of the comic, it begins with a theory and a possibility of saving humanity. It is a theory that sounds full of danger from the start but is done out of desperation. The story then transforms into a road trip across this ruined land, searching for Jim Hammond. It isn’t quite as dark as the first issue was with the introduction of hope. The exploration is fascinating, traveling into New York. At the same time, some of the past is brought back. Namor and Cage enter a familiar landmark in NYC, which turns into an intense battle. It seems to send the story’s direction somewhere I was not expecting at all. It goes from searching for a hero to hunting a target.

This series also contains a bit of a double act as Cage and Namor set off on a voyage together. There was the option of Captain America, who has considered Namor a friend for almost a century. But Cage is much more interesting with their vicious fight from the opening issue. It provides the main character with someone who will hold him to account. Even within a single chapter, the relationship between the duo evolves. But what I also love is that Cantwell brings up Namor’s most important and famous connections. A poignant flashback between him and Sue Storm demonstrates that they will never be an item. And what is so amazing about the book is that it seems to homage to the oldest rivalry in Marvel’s history and my favorite comic, Marvels. The Human Torch is regarded almost as a fabled figure, mythical and forgotten, by those on the ground.

The art is tremendous. So far, all of the superheroes included in the book have aged, stuck in an inhospitable world. Those like Namor and Captain America, who age slower than others, don’t look too advanced in years. But Luke looks much older, transformed into a leader of what’s left of his community. Both he and Namor are placed into special protective suits, almost identical in design. Their increased size is interesting but I preferred their post-apocalyptic costumes. However, there is a canonical reason for the suits, which shows a commitment to detail. The locations and devastated cities are fantastic and atmospheric, creating the impression that the whole world was changed.

The colors are fantastic. The tones in the background, of the buildings and the sky, look sickly and ill. There isn’t a welcoming area anywhere on the surface world, and the colors brilliantly encapsulate that. The final page was the most surprising with colors as a rich and powerful purple shade covers the page. The lettering is very easy to read and follow at all times.

Namor: The Sub-Mariner – Conquered Shores #2 expands a superb story. Both writer and artist reveal more of a world of their creation, one that is near death. And there is also a mission that carries humanity’s fate on its back. It beautifully contains an old friend to do so, one that links this alternate future to the very beginning. It is a story that celebrates history and old friends.

Namor: The Sub-Mariner – Conquered Shores #2 is available now wherever comics are sold.


Namor: The Sub-Mariner - Conquered Shores #2
5

TL;DR

Namor: The Sub-Mariner – Conquered Shores #2 expands a superb story. Both writer and artist reveal more of a world of their creation, one that is near death. And there is also a mission that carries humanity’s fate on its back. It beautifully contains an old friend to do so, one that links this alternate future to the very beginning. It is a story that celebrates history and old friends.

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