REVIEW: ‘Savage Avengers,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Savage Avengers #3 - But Why Tho

Savage Avengers #3 is published by Marvel Comics, written by David Pepose, art by Carlos Magno, colours by Espen Grundetjern, and letters by Travis Lanham. The Savage Avengers are trapped in the Hyborian Age, being hunted by a Deathlok. But in this issue, they decide to hunt the hunter.

The epic action that this series has become synonymous with wastes no time in sparking up again. For most of the issue, the plot is spent in battle as the team ambushes the Deathlok hunter. The undead cyborg is bounced between the team members, having to deal with each hero one by one. This battle is awesome and the energy is kept high for its entirety, and having the sequence instead of all at once allows for a constant shifting of circumstances. And just when there may be a flicker of slowing down a mysterious foe enters to change the state of play entirely. Pepose is demonstrating how to make an all-action series that also has a plot worth investing in. The final part of the comic leaves everyone reeling, but the last page comes out of nowhere and is utterly shocking. 

This team is one of the most badass lineups there is, and that is demonstrated during the tag-team style fight. Each one brings something remarkably different and extreme to the table. There is also a clear progression through the roster, ending with Conan getting to fight the being that has targeted him specifically. It is great to see Elektra be naturally selected as the tactician and leader of the group. She has respect for her new teammates and ruthlessness when making a plan. There is also a fantastic narration added alongside the battle that gives majestic qualities to every character. It describes what makes them excellent or powerful, like their legend is being written as they fight.

The art is terrific as the Hyborian adventure continues. The epic fight is superbly orchestrated and choreographed. The individuality of every character is clear in the way they move into battle. Their unique properties are put on resplendent display, from Cloak’s flowing, well, cloak to Anti-Venom’s agility to Weapon H’s enormity. With them being the aggressors, they are presented as bigger and more imposing, always having the upper hand. The panel layouts are cleverly changed to fit the needs of the battle. When the comic changes completely in the latter stages, there is some haunting and disturbing imagery used that verges on distressing.

The colours are brilliant. The understanding of lighting by Grundetjern is excellent. The juxtaposition of blinding spotlights and submerging shadows alters the perspective. When there is a light source, that radiates outwards as it naturally should do. The characters aren’t necessarily a variety of colourful shades, but the stark white on some of them is certainly distinctive. The lettering is great for the word balloons, but the colour choices in the caption boxes can be difficult to read.

Savage Avengers #3 is magnificently full-on. The drama and action are active almost constantly, constantly throwing the villain around the heroes for them to have a crack at him. The understanding that this group is purely heavy metal gives the book the freedom to embrace the chaos. But there is also the opportunity for powerful storytelling and some surprises that can bring the speed of the pace to a crunching stop.

Savage Avengers #3 is available where comics are sold.


Savage Avengers #3
4.5

TL;DR

Savage Avengers #3 is magnificently full-on. The drama and action are active almost constantly, constantly throwing the villain around the heroes for them to have a crack at him. The understanding that this group is purely heavy metal gives the book the freedom to embrace the chaos. But there is also the opportunity for powerful storytelling and some surprises that can bring the speed of the pace to a crunching stop.

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