REVIEW: ‘Prince Freya’ Volume 6

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Prince Freya Volume 6 - But Why Tho

Prince Freya is one of my favorite shojo manga series. Centered on Freya, who is pretending to be the dead Prince Edvard of Tyr, the story has followed our lead as she’s grieved, fought, and found resiliency she didn’t know she had. Prince Freya Volume 6 is written and illustrated by mangaka Keiko Ishihara. It’s published and localized in English by VIZ Media through their imprint Shojo Beat. This English translation and adaptation is by John Werry and features touch-up art & lettering by Sabrina Heep.

Freya is still on her quest for allies. She has been granted Tyr’s royal jewel and hoping that she can turn one of the neighboring lands against Sigurd. And save her people. But the journey keeps getting more dangerous. Freya and her knights have survived a voyage across a pirate-infested sea, but that doesn’t mean that they’re ready for the Nactian Court. In Prince Freya, Freya and Julius are abducted by spies after they attempt to court Sophie, the lady of Nact. Thrown into a dungeon to languish, they soon learn that in order to save themselves and Tyr, they must first save the heart of Nacht.

While each volume of Prince Freya has propelled the story forward with twists, Volume 6 offers a culmination of everything that Freya has learned over the volumes (and a twist). Freya is strong in this volume and completely unflinching, using both her physicality and her ability to connect with people to save herself and Julius. While we get Ishihara’s romantic and dynamic action sequences that make the volume fun to read, it’s the diversity of women in Prince Freya Volume 6 that makes it a standout.

Freya has been shown in a male world continuously. As Edvard, she’s had to find the ferocity in her emotions and focus on leading armies of men. However, this volume shows her tapping into her warmer side and using her ability to inspire and connect primarily to get herself and Nact out of its current terrifying situation. With Freya, we see a woman who has to be a man in order to succeed. She’s physically strong and carries the weight of her kingdom on her shoulders. A tom-boy love interest, her role is unique. Additionally, the volume features Sophie and Edda.

Sophie is, in many ways, a femme fatale. She wields her sexuality and curiosity, as we saw in the last volume, and her thirst power showcases her selfishness. She is beautiful and capable of violence and harm in a conniving and evil way. Edda, Sophie’s handmaiden, is an outcast. Branded the Curse of Nact by the people of the land, she is an executioner, finding more joy among dead bodies than the Nactian Court. With a dark background, her eccentricity hides her vulnerability, something that Freya taps into.

Beyond this, Prince Freya Volume 6 continues to stoke the romantic and sexual tension between Freya and Julius. The way that Ishihara has been able to balance action, drama, plot twists, and romance is outstanding. The time period, the art, and Ishihara’s ability to never lose sight of the plot despite packing in twists is why this continues to be a series to read.

Prince Freya Volume 6 is now wherever books are sold. 


Prince Freya Volume 6
5

TL;DR

The way that Ishihara has been able to balance action, drama, plot twists, and romance is outstanding. The time period, the art, and Ishihara’s ability to never lose sight of the plot despite packing in twists is why this continues to be a series to read.

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