REVIEW: ‘The Invincible Iron Man,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The Invincible Iron Man #1

The Invincible Iron Man #1 is the start of a new series published by Marvel Comics, written by Gerry Duggan, art by Juan Frigeri, colors by Bryan Valenza, and letters by Joe Caramagna. Tony Stark has very little left, not owning most of the places and things that have his name on them. But as an unexplained explosion rips his home to shreds, he begins to write an autobiography.

The beginning of a new series is daunting, but Duggan starts afresh and continues past stories. The opening is an expansive origin story that travels from Stark in the cave where Iron Man was born to the last actions of Christopher Cantwell’s previous run. Remarkably, what has come before is acknowledged, with the possibility of being used in future issues. But simultaneously, the comic sets off on its journey quickly. After the recap, it doesn’t take long to make an inciting incident. There are multiple mysteries set early as Tony begins this book at a very low point. The Invincible Iron Man #1 is also action-packed. The first explosion sets up tensions as it’s difficult to know whether there will be a next one. Duggan also superbly sets up a rule that actions, especially explosive and destructive ones, have consequences. 

Starting a series with Tony Stark at a low point is not necessarily new to Iron Man. But this may be a particular nadir for him. Duggan makes a point to showcase all the places with Tony’s name on them, from headquarters to towers to homes. Those are gone. He now has one armor and one building, both of which take a beating quickly. He is pessimistic throughout the book, which can sometimes be overbearing, but it describes his stress and turmoil. It is also interesting to see the level of outside influence in this comic from the start. Other Avengers and members of Iron Man’s supporting cast appear frequently or are mentioned, and it opens the floor up for a variety of potential inclusions.

The art is very interesting. Iron Man artists do tend to be more realistic in style than other books. Frigeri fits in and is incredible. The inking is thick, with some heavy line weights around the outlines of the characters. This makes each individual person stand out. But inside, the details are intricate and immaculate. Influences of Stuart Immonen and Coipel can be detected within the facial structure and illustrations of the eyes. The armor is simple yet gorgeous, bringing unforgettable suiting-up moments and flight scenes. The action scenes are fantastic, almost classic in their choreography and set pieces

The colors are stunning, especially on the Iron Man armor. The realism of the art style is matched with a real shine added to the suit, with a flawless metallic sheen to every panel. It glints in response to the right light, the whole costume beautiful and heroic. The lettering is really easy to read, especially the almost official text in the narration boxes.

The Invincible Iron Man #1 is an explosive start. Duggan’s run begins with a bang, and the energy manifested by that will hopefully inform the rest of the series. There is a streamlined nature to the comic, with Tony Stark basically having the armor on his back and nothing else. It’s an Iron Man adventure in the heart of the Marvel Universe, borrowing the best the world has to offer with cameos and mysteries galore.

The Invincible Iron Man #1 is available now wherever comics are sold.


The Invincible Iron Man #1
4.5

TL;DR

The Invincible Iron Man #1 is an explosive start. Duggan’s run begins with a bang, and the energy manifested by that will hopefully inform the rest of the series. There is a streamlined nature to the comic, with Tony Stark basically having the armor on his back and nothing else. It’s an Iron Man adventure in the heart of the Marvel Universe, borrowing the best the world has to offer with cameos and mysteries galore.

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