REVIEW: ‘Demon Wars: The Iron Samurai,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The Iron Samurai #1 - But Why Tho

Demon Wars: The Iron Samurai #1 is written by Peach Momoko and Zack Davisson, illustrated and colored by Momoko, and lettered by VC’s Ariana Maher. It’s published by Marvel Comics. Mariko Yashida is attempting to return to a normal life while also reckoning with the fact that she’s half-demon. Things aren’t made easier by the fact that Mariko has started to see all manner of strange demons. This eventually leads her into a conflict between two factions of demons, as the demon Kigandoshi’s been causing earthquakes and Mariko is connected to the current crisis in more ways than one.

When Momoko released the original Demon Days saga, I was utterly blown away by the display of craft and creativity that went into making this new world. Alternate versions of Marvel and DC characters aren’t a new concept , especially with films like Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness being built on that exact concept. Demon Days took this to the next level by reinterpreting certain characters as figures from Japanese myth. The Hulk was an oni, Psylock was a demon hunter, etc.

Demon Wars continues with this trend, as Momoko finds clever ways to continue the mix of Marvel heroes and Japanese myths. Iron Man is now reinterpreted as a bake-yori, aka a possessed suit of samurai armor. The Falcon is now a mysterious masked tengu referred to as “Hayabusa,” which is Japanese for peregrine falcon. And as for Kigandoshi, he bears a resemblance to a certain Marvel villain. Even the end of the issue hints at a certain Avenger appearing down the line.

The Iron Samurai also continues to boast some of the best artwork in the comic medium, thanks to the shifting color palettes as well as the way the art flows and ebbs. A dream sequence takes place entirely in black and white, making it look as though Mariko is being swallowed alive by shadows. This slowly gives way to a warmer burst of colors as she enters an underground chamber. Those colors include the red and gold of the Bake-Yori’s armor, and Hayabusa’s jet black feathers.

Momoko is once again joined by Davisson and Maher. Having served as an integral part of the original Demon Days, both continue to add to the story and structure of The Iron Samurai. Maher is very creative with her sound effects; the “Fwoop” of a flaming arrow literally tails alongside said arrow as it flies at its target. And Davisson once again launches the “Yokai Files,” which serve to give more context to the world and teach readers more about Japanese culture in the process. I wouldn’t mind seeing many more Demon Days stories from this creative team.

Demon Wars: The Iron Samurai #1 launches a new story in Peach Momoko’s manga-inspired Marvel Universe, with all the craft and creativity that powered the Demon Days saga. This series is growing into a must-read, both for longtime Marvel fans and newcomers alike. Definitely pick it up if you have the chance.

Demon Wars: The Iron Samurai #1 is available wherever comics are sold.


Demon Wars: The Iron Samurai #1
5

TL;DR

Demon Wars: The Iron Samurai #1 launches a new story in Peach Momoko’s manga-inspired Marvel Universe, with all the craft and creativity that powered the Demon Days saga. This series is growing into a must-read, both for longtime Marvel fans and newcomers alike. Definitely pick it up if you have the chance.

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